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By Virginia Center For Women
January 07, 2019
Category: Women's HealthCare
Tags: Hysterectomy  

Why Would a Hysterectomy Be Necessary?

Do you need a hysterectomy? Hysterectomy is the second most common surgery among women in America. A hysterectomy is a surgical operation to remove a woman's womb, or uterus. The uterus is where a fetus develops when a woman is pregnant. Women undergo a hysterectomy for different reasons. Read on to learn about the conditions that may be treated by hysterectomy.

Cancer- You have invasive cancer of the cervix, uterus, vagina, fallopian tubes, or ovaries. Hysterectomy is often medically necessary and lifesaving when patients are diagnosed with invasive cancer. The procedure may involve removing the uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. The type of hysterectomy performed depends on your situation.

Uterine Fibroids- Uterine fibroids are treated by a hysterectomy. Uterine fibroids are benign growths in the uterine wall. In some women, they can cause long-term heavy bleeding and pain. Your doctor may try other procedures, like endometrial ablation or myomectomy, before a hysterectomy.

Heavy Periods- Infection, changes in hormone levels, or cancer can cause heavy periods. Some women lose a large amount of blood during their periods. They may also experience other symptoms, such as stomach cramps and pain. For some patients, the symptoms can have a significant impact on their quality of life. In some cases, removing the uterus may be the only way of stopping heavy or prolonged vaginal bleeding. 

Uterine Prolapse- Uterine prolapse, which is a sliding of the uterus from its position into the vaginal canal. If uterine prolapse is severe, your OBGYN might recommend a hysterectomy. Talk with your healthcare provider about all your treatment options to be sure you understand the benefits and risks of each so that you can choose what's best for you.

Endometriosis- Endometriosis occurs when the tissue that lines the uterus grows on other pelvic organs, such as the ovaries. This can cause bleeding between periods and severe pain. While there's no cure for endometriosis, many women undergo a hysterectomy to alleviate intolerable symptoms of the disease.

Today, thanks to advances in technology, a hysterectomy is much less invasive which means a faster recovery time. Talk to your healthcare provider about how a hysterectomy might improve your symptoms. Hysterectomy has improved the lives of millions of people. And it can do the same for you.

By Virginia Center For Women
December 14, 2018
Category: Fertility
Tags: Infertility  

If you are having trouble conceiving it’s important to turn to your OBGYN for help.

While it isn’t a topic that a lot of people feel comfortable talking about, at some point, it’s important to acknowledge that you and your partner are having trouble conceiving. Given the significance of the topic, it’s important to know when to see a doctor for an evaluation.

 

When should I visit an OBGYN?

At some point you may be wondering whether or not you should seek a consultation with a fertility doctor. Here’s when you should,

  • If you are under the age of 35, have been trying to conceive, and haven’t used birth control for over 12 months, then it’s time to schedule a consultation
  • If you are over 35 and have been trying to actively conceive for six months, you should get evaluated right away

 

What will happen during my appointment?

Your OBGYN will first want to make sure you are ovulating, which every woman can easily figure out on her own by charting her basal body temperature for a few months. This may provide some answers as to why you are having trouble conceiving.

Fertility testing may also be recommended. During this appointment, we will go through your medical history and talk to you about different tests such as an ultrasound, blood work, and physical exams for both partners, which can provide the information we need to figure out why you are having trouble getting pregnant.

Once testing has been completed we will be able to make a definitive diagnosis as to why you and your partner are having difficulty conceiving. Even if we aren’t able to find anything wrong, you can still receive fertility treatment to improve your chances of getting pregnant.

 

What are my fertility treatment options?

The most common types of fertility treatments include,

  • Medication (to help your body release one or more eggs each month)
  • In-vitro fertilization (IVF)
  • Surgery (to fix defects, remove fibroids, treat PCOS, etc.)

 

If you and your partner are having trouble conceiving, it’s best to have these concerns addressed as soon as possible. Many women go on to have healthy, happy babies with the help of their obstetrician. Call your doctor to learn more about the fertility treatment options available to you.

By Virginia Center For Women
December 06, 2018
Category: Women's HealthCare
Tags: Pap smear  

The Importance of a Pap Smear

A pap smear, also known as a Pap test or cervical smear, is a routine procedure done at your gynecologist’s office to detect any irregularities in and on the cervix. The name comes from an abbreviation of the inventor’s name, Greek doctor Georgios Papanikolaou, and this test has been performed since 1923. It is currently the most common form of cervical screening in the United States.

What Are Pap Smears?

Pap smears are procedures done in-office and are performed by a doctor on an exam table. The vaginal opening is expanded with a tool called a speculum, and cells are then collected from the outside of the cervix using a tool called a spatula, which is very different from the one you may have in your kitchen. This procedure only takes a few minutes, and is very important for female health. Some patients report mild cramping during or immediately after the test, but it is usually very brief.

The collected cells are transferred to a glass slide and are examined under a microscope. The reason for this test is to identify any pre-cancerous conditions, most of which are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). These results can usually be used to diagnose other cervical problems and can take a week or two to come back.

A Pap smear is recommended for women to get every three years starting at age 21 until 65, barring any pre-existing conditions or any atypical results; those cases may call for more frequent testing. Regular Pap smears can reduce fatalities caused by cervical cancer very significantly, granted that patients with abnormal results follow their doctors’ treatment recommendations.

Be sure to stay up to date with your Pap smears and call your gynecologist with any questions!

By Virginia Center For Women
November 16, 2018
Tags: Endometriosis   Pain  

Managing endometriosis

Endometriosis is a gynecological condition affecting millions of American women of child-bearing years. An extreme overgrowth of the lining of the uterus (endometrium), this painful and persistent malady leaves some women infertile, in pain and even debilitated from the symptoms. Are you one of them? A visit with your OB/GYN doctor will uncover the reasons and treatments for your endometriosis.

Symptoms of endometriosis

The most frequent symptom is severe cramping before, during and after menstruation. Periods may be unusually long in duration or very short. Lower back pain and migraine headaches occur through out the monthly cycle, and many women report difficulty with bowel movements and a feeling of "heaviness"in the lower abdomen.

Some sufferers of endometriosis experience weight gain and unfortunately...infertility. Endometriosis can block the fallopian tubes and interior of the uterus so sperm cannot reach and fertilize eggs. Endometrial tissue often appears in odd areas such as on the ovaries or the bowel.

Who gets endometriosis?

The Office on Women's Health reports that a full 11 percent of women between the ages of 15 and 44 suffer with endometriosis. The condition appears to run in families, and it is common among women who have never had children. Autoimmune conditions such as allergies, MS and Lupus often co-exist with endometriosis.

Finding and treating endometriosis

Reporting your symptoms of endometriosis to your obstetrician/gynecologist is critical to diagnosis and treatment. He or she will perform a pelvic examination and may do ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging.

Treatment options vary, but frankly, surgery usually is not a first choice. Medical management with hormones and pain medications is preferable. Your OB/GYN will want to monitor your symptoms and treatment plan closely to help you manage this often-frustrating condition.

In addition, many women experience significant symptom relief if they:

  • Exercise regularly.
  • Deep breathe through periods of abdominal or lower back pain.
  • Manage stress levels and the amount of cortisol, the stress hormone, in the bloodstream.
  • Eat more vegetables and fruits, and reduce gluten and refined sugars which produce inflammatory reactions in the abdomen.
It's possible
 
You can live well with endometriosis. Thoughtfully record your symptoms, and then, go see your OB/GYN physician. Together, you can work through this difficult condition and optimize your comfort, fertility and overall wellness.
By Virginia Center For Women
November 01, 2018
Category: Women's HealthCare
Tags: IUD   Birth Control   Diaphragm  

Choosing the right birth control to suit your needs and lifestyle is a very important and personal decision that you will have to consider if you are sexually active and do not want to get pregnant. During this time it’s important to have an OBGYN that you can turn to not just for proper checkups and health care, but also to present you with the different birth control options available to you so that you can make an informed decision about your sexual health.

Birth control falls into two categories: Hormonal and non-hormonal. While this may certainly be a factor in the decision-making process there are also other factors and benefits that some birth control may offer that may make it more ideal for you than others. For example, there are some forms of birth control that can improve cramping and other PMS symptoms, while other birth control options are easy to use and don’t require you to take them at the same time each day. These are all things to consider when it comes to choosing the proper birth control for you.

There are approximately 12 different kinds of birth control including:

  • Condoms
  • Spermicides
  • Contraceptive pills
  • Birth control implant
  • Vaginal ring
  • Patch
  • Diaphragm
  • Intrauterine device (IUD)
  • Injection
  • Tubal ligation
  • Abstinence

As you might imagine, contraceptive pills, the ring, patch, implant, injection, and plastic IUDs are hormonal, which means that these methods release hormones that prevent the ovaries from releasing an egg.

Non-hormonal methods include the diaphragm, copper IUD, spermicides, and condoms. When used correctly, condoms are also able to protect against STDS. It’s important to understand that while many of these methods are designed to prevent pregnancy they do not protect against STDS. This is why it’s still important to wear a condom even if you are taking birth control.

Of course, for women who are already finished with family planning or have chosen not to have children, they may opt for tubal ligation, which is a permanent way to prevent pregnancy.

 

It’s important that you fully understand the advantages and disadvantages of each birth control method beforehand. This is why it’s so vital to have a gynecologist you can trust to sit down with you and to help you determine the best option for your needs. Call your OBGYN today to schedule an appointment.





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